CommunicationSkills_1440149047

COMMUNICATION SKILLS – the what and why?

CommunicationSkills_1440149047

Do we know how to talk? Yes, if we speak and people understand us, that means we do know how to talk.
Well in that case, what are communication skills? If it is simply the art of talking in a way that people understand, what is there to learn in this art? Or why is it good or bad?

buzz

Several people have similar questions regarding communication skills. But it is important to understand that communicating effectively involves not only speech, accent and grammar, but also the right usage of tone, mannerisms, body language, rhetoric and many more. I do not use these terms to scare the learner. But these are terms that one should be aware of. This is where language trainers and soft skills trainers come in- to help the learner use the appropriate language for each situation and in an effective manner.

a young woman talking to herself on the tin can phone

What hampers learners from learning the correct language use, when some of their own peers do it better. Well, things like mother tongue and linguistic influence, and cultural diversity make a difference. There are a few linguistic factors that may actually help a teacher guide the the learner. But these factors are vital deciders in the language learning process.
So communication skills are a set of skills required by individuals for effective and impactful communication, irrespective of their profession, area of work , job profile etc. and yet prove to be a very decisive factor in ones’ career growth.

grammar cop

Dr Sunita Agrawal has over 15 years experience in teaching English to students with different backgrounds and requirements. She also conducts soft-skills workshops in corporate companies and mentors students appearing for the GRE, GMAT, TOEFL, IELTS and SAT examinations.

Sunita

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A Brief Look at Pronouns

Pronouns are used to replace nouns within sentences, making them less repetitive and mechanic. For example, saying “Mary didn’t go to school because Mary was sick” doesn’t sound very good. Instead, if you say “Mary didn’t go to school because she was sick” it will make the sentence flow better.

There are several types of pronouns, below you will find the most common ones:

  1. Subjective personal pronouns.As the name implies, subjective pronouns act as subjects within sentences. They are: I, you, he, she, we, they, and it.

Example: I am going to the bank while he is going to the market.

  1. Objective personal pronouns. These pronouns act as the object of verbs within sentences. They are: me, you, him, her, us, them and it.

Example: The ball was going to hit me in the face.

  1. Possessive personal pronouns. These pronouns are used to indicate possession, and they are placed after the object in question (as opposed to possessive adjectives like my and your, which are placed before the object). They are: mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs and its.

Example of possessive adjective: This is my car.
Example of possessive pronoun: This car is mine.

  1. Reflexive pronouns. This special class of pronouns is used when the object is the same as the subject on the sentence. They are myself, yourself, himself, herself, ourselves, themselves and itself.

Example: I managed to cut myself in the kitchen.

  1. Interrogative pronouns. As you probably guessed these pronouns are used to ask questions. They are what, which, who, whom and whose.

Example: What are the odds?

  1. Demonstrative pronouns. These pronouns are used to indicate a noun and distinguish it from other entities. Notice that demonstrative pronouns replace the noun (while demonstrative determiners modify them). They are: this, that, these, those.

Example of a demonstrative determiner: This house is ugly.
Example of a demonstrative pronoun: This is the right one.

  1. Indefinite pronouns. As the name implies, indefinite pronouns do not refer to a specific thing, place or person. There are many of them, including anyone, anywhere, everyone, none, someone and so on.

Example: Everyone is going to the party.

 

Keep reading and following the blog for more such interesting lessons. Our next post will cover Verbs.

 

 

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basics of english

English Basics: 101

We’ve all studied English in school. But after the basic education, we pretty much forget about this beautiful subject and language though we pretty much use it every day. Today we will take a look at some grammar basics that will help you make your English speaking and writing that much better. Learning never stops!

 

Sentences

Sentences are made of two parts: the subject and the predicate.

The subject is the person or thing that acts or is described in the sentence. The predicate, on the other hand, is that action or description.

Complete sentences need both the subject and the predicate.

 

Clauses

Sentences can be broken down into clauses.

For example: The boy is going to the school, and he is going to eat there.

This is a complete sentence composed of two clauses. There are mainly two types of clauses: independent clauses and subordinate clauses.

Independent clauses act as complete sentences, while subordinate clauses cannot stand alone and need another clause to complete their meaning. For example:

Independent clause: The boy went to the school.

Subordinate clause: After the boy went to the school…

 

Phrases

A group of two or more grammatically linked words that do not have subject and predicate is a phrase.

Example of a complete sentence: The girl is at home, and tomorrow she is going to the amusement park.
Example of a clause: The girl is at home

Example of a phrase: The girl… You can see that “the girl” is a phrase located in the first clause of the complete sentence above.

Phrases act like parts of speech inside clauses. That is, they can act as nouns, adjectives, adverbs and so on.

 

Parts of Speech

A word is a “part of speech” only when it is used in a sentence. The function the word serves in a sentence is what makes it whatever part of speech it is.

For example, the word “run” can be used as more than one part of speech:

Sammy hit a home run.

Run is a noun, direct object of hit.

You mustn’t run near the swimming pool.

Run is a verb, part of the verb phrase must (not) run.

Traditional grammar classifies words based on eight parts of speech: the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the verb, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

 

In our next blog, we will explore the different parts of speech, how they function and their proper usage. Until then, make sure you get your basics right and be ready for the next lesson!

 

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