A Brief Look at Pronouns

Pronouns are used to replace nouns within sentences, making them less repetitive and mechanic. For example, saying “Mary didn’t go to school because Mary was sick” doesn’t sound very good. Instead, if you say “Mary didn’t go to school because she was sick” it will make the sentence flow better.

There are several types of pronouns, below you will find the most common ones:

  1. Subjective personal pronouns.As the name implies, subjective pronouns act as subjects within sentences. They are: I, you, he, she, we, they, and it.

Example: I am going to the bank while he is going to the market.

  1. Objective personal pronouns. These pronouns act as the object of verbs within sentences. They are: me, you, him, her, us, them and it.

Example: The ball was going to hit me in the face.

  1. Possessive personal pronouns. These pronouns are used to indicate possession, and they are placed after the object in question (as opposed to possessive adjectives like my and your, which are placed before the object). They are: mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs and its.

Example of possessive adjective: This is my car.
Example of possessive pronoun: This car is mine.

  1. Reflexive pronouns. This special class of pronouns is used when the object is the same as the subject on the sentence. They are myself, yourself, himself, herself, ourselves, themselves and itself.

Example: I managed to cut myself in the kitchen.

  1. Interrogative pronouns. As you probably guessed these pronouns are used to ask questions. They are what, which, who, whom and whose.

Example: What are the odds?

  1. Demonstrative pronouns. These pronouns are used to indicate a noun and distinguish it from other entities. Notice that demonstrative pronouns replace the noun (while demonstrative determiners modify them). They are: this, that, these, those.

Example of a demonstrative determiner: This house is ugly.
Example of a demonstrative pronoun: This is the right one.

  1. Indefinite pronouns. As the name implies, indefinite pronouns do not refer to a specific thing, place or person. There are many of them, including anyone, anywhere, everyone, none, someone and so on.

Example: Everyone is going to the party.

 

Keep reading and following the blog for more such interesting lessons. Our next post will cover Verbs.

 

 

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basics of english

English Basics: 101

We’ve all studied English in school. But after the basic education, we pretty much forget about this beautiful subject and language though we pretty much use it every day. Today we will take a look at some grammar basics that will help you make your English speaking and writing that much better. Learning never stops!

 

Sentences

Sentences are made of two parts: the subject and the predicate.

The subject is the person or thing that acts or is described in the sentence. The predicate, on the other hand, is that action or description.

Complete sentences need both the subject and the predicate.

 

Clauses

Sentences can be broken down into clauses.

For example: The boy is going to the school, and he is going to eat there.

This is a complete sentence composed of two clauses. There are mainly two types of clauses: independent clauses and subordinate clauses.

Independent clauses act as complete sentences, while subordinate clauses cannot stand alone and need another clause to complete their meaning. For example:

Independent clause: The boy went to the school.

Subordinate clause: After the boy went to the school…

 

Phrases

A group of two or more grammatically linked words that do not have subject and predicate is a phrase.

Example of a complete sentence: The girl is at home, and tomorrow she is going to the amusement park.
Example of a clause: The girl is at home

Example of a phrase: The girl… You can see that “the girl” is a phrase located in the first clause of the complete sentence above.

Phrases act like parts of speech inside clauses. That is, they can act as nouns, adjectives, adverbs and so on.

 

Parts of Speech

A word is a “part of speech” only when it is used in a sentence. The function the word serves in a sentence is what makes it whatever part of speech it is.

For example, the word “run” can be used as more than one part of speech:

Sammy hit a home run.

Run is a noun, direct object of hit.

You mustn’t run near the swimming pool.

Run is a verb, part of the verb phrase must (not) run.

Traditional grammar classifies words based on eight parts of speech: the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the verb, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

 

In our next blog, we will explore the different parts of speech, how they function and their proper usage. Until then, make sure you get your basics right and be ready for the next lesson!

 

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Why English Matters

English is very well the best thing that came out of the British Colonial invasion and settlement. It unified the world and gave a common voice and language to everyone. It is considered one of the most expressive and eloquent languages for communicating. Some of the world’s best literature, speeches and art has been written in and translated in English so that their beauty reaches one and all. It is truly a language of the masses with about 340 million native speakers and another 510 million who speak it as a second language. It is the second most spoken language of the world and one of the few language which has more people speaking it as a second/foreign language than native speakers!

In a multilingual and multinational setup of the current commerce and business, English is a link language, giving the ability to people of different linguistic backgrounds to interact and exchange ideas and thoughts. In countries where there are more than two languages spoken by the population, it provides a common platform for communication and expression. In an age where the world is a global village, where thoughts and ideas need to be excghanged on a continual basis for effective work flow, English provides the equal and communal footing needed for a smooth process advancement. It removes the linguistic barriers created by cultural, social and national boundaries.

Currently, many of the top films, books, music, journals, news reporting and any content in general is generated using English as the language medium. Being versed in English allows a person to explore the multitude of content present on the internet, and everywhere else too. Most cross border business communication happens in English, and it is also the official language of numerous international organizations such as UNO, WHO, UNESCO, NATO, EU among others. This sure does establishes its position as the most important language of the world.

It might seem like an uphill task to learn English, but it is most definitely worth the time and effort expended to accrue English proficiency. It opens up avenues of opportunities in education, business, commerce, trade etc., giving a definite advantage to people with great command over the English language.

Stay ahead of the race, and explore amazing English learning opportunities at LearnSocial.

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